Link

crystal28dreams:

So, everyone warns you about different things when traveling abroad. They warn you about the culture shock you may experience, they warn you of things you should be sure to pack, places you should be sure to avoid, how to make friends, how to not look quite so American, and a number of other…

Photo
One aspect of Japanese and Chinese culture that I found the most interesting in comparison with American culture is one that’s very visible. Everything in China and Japan had… color!  This is not to say that American culture doesn’t have color.  However, everything from the colors of the leaves, to the hue of the historical buildings, to the accent colors on modern buildings, China and Japan had very very vivid colors compared to America. 

I was in Washington, D.C. a few weeks before I left, and all the buildings there were very starkly white or bone colored. This seems to be the same in any American city; buildings have color, but they’re rarely vivid. There are a few exceptions: the Empire State Building at night, for example… But in Japan and China, buildings not only had color, but they were vividly colored, and especially at night their color patterns were brilliantly illuminated. Lasers and flashing lights, neon, and moving lights were common, especially in shopping malls.

I honestly don’t know why this is.  But I have what I think is a good guess.  Perhaps over the centuries people took inspiration from something that was all around them: nature.  The red leaves in fall in Japan were the most red, vivid leaves that I’ve ever seen. The oceans, which surround Japan, were darkly blue, and the leaves very green outside of fall. Since 80% of Japan is hills or mountains, they’re very easy to see. Imagine waking out of your home, to see in front of you a canvas of nature.  I think I would find that very inspiring. 

I’d really like to research this idea more… What part of Japanese and Chinese culture inspire such vivid displays that we don’t have in America?

I think I need to go back to china and Japan.  

-Jeff

One aspect of Japanese and Chinese culture that I found the most interesting in comparison with American culture is one that’s very visible. Everything in China and Japan had… color! This is not to say that American culture doesn’t have color. However, everything from the colors of the leaves, to the hue of the historical buildings, to the accent colors on modern buildings, China and Japan had very very vivid colors compared to America.

I was in Washington, D.C. a few weeks before I left, and all the buildings there were very starkly white or bone colored. This seems to be the same in any American city; buildings have color, but they’re rarely vivid. There are a few exceptions: the Empire State Building at night, for example… But in Japan and China, buildings not only had color, but they were vividly colored, and especially at night their color patterns were brilliantly illuminated. Lasers and flashing lights, neon, and moving lights were common, especially in shopping malls.

I honestly don’t know why this is. But I have what I think is a good guess. Perhaps over the centuries people took inspiration from something that was all around them: nature. The red leaves in fall in Japan were the most red, vivid leaves that I’ve ever seen. The oceans, which surround Japan, were darkly blue, and the leaves very green outside of fall. Since 80% of Japan is hills or mountains, they’re very easy to see. Imagine waking out of your home, to see in front of you a canvas of nature. I think I would find that very inspiring.

I’d really like to research this idea more… What part of Japanese and Chinese culture inspire such vivid displays that we don’t have in America?

I think I need to go back to china and Japan.

-Jeff

Link

crystal28dreams:

12-3-12

Already December…. Wow!

I realized, walking home the other day, that one of the things I will miss when I return home will be my commute to school. On days off, I would often go in, because the atmosphere on campus is very conducive for studying, and I love taking my commute.

It…

Photoset

Dressing Up, Japanese Style…

Text

Hikone Castle

The group visited one of Japan’s few remaining Tokugawa-era castles in the town of Hikone, about an hour’s train ride from Kyoto.  Marvelous weather and spectacular views during one of Japan’s loveliest seasons; photos below…

Photoset

At Nara’s world-famous Todai-ji temple; who’s the monk?  Who’s the NCC student?

Text

Happy Birthday Kayla! Happy Birthday Ryan!

On Friday we celebrated Kayla and Ryan’s birthdays—the last we’ll have before returning home.  The staff at Kyoto Gakuen helped us get a cake, and even helped us with the decorations; you can see the results below.  Lovely to look at and delicious to eat!  According to Japanese custom and law, as 20-year olds they are now adults.

Link

crystal28dreams:

11/24/12

This last week, Americans both at home and abroad were celebrating Thanksgiving. I had a lot more time, this weekend, to think about what I was thankful for than I thought I was going to. I’m happy to have had such an opportunity to, though.

I was supposed to go to Tokyo this…

Photo

(Source: tiffany-in-asia)

Tags: crystal
Link

creativekaleidoscope:

When I was visiting Sergio in Nagoya we saw a little girl dressed in Kimono. I assumed it must have been some sort of special occasion but I wasn’t sure of the exact reason. The following week our group went to the Heian shrine in Kyoto, where we saw another cute little girl in Kimono. Our tour…